Takuma wings

What wing size should I take?
Wing size guide
 
Our wing sizes range from 2.6 to 6 meters but how do you know which is the right size for you?
 

Having the right wing size is crucial for your wing riding progression no matter your level. Going out with a wing that is too small or too big for the conditions can cause more frustration than enjoyment.

 
We only want you to have fun on the water (or land depending on where you choose to take your wing) so we have put together this quick guide to help you choose the wing size best suited for you.
 

Takuma wings
The larger wing sizes are best suited for lighter wind conditions, as their larger surface area can catch more wind. 

 

The smaller wing sizes can be used in heavier wind conditions, they are more manageable and easier to hold, while at the same time generate adequate power to gain speed.
 
Takuma wingfoil
Your weight, riding level and wind conditions are key to determining the right wing size choice. It is important to have sufficient power for a steady start, it is much harder to learn or progress if you are too under or over powered. 

Our WR Modell III wings have been designed with a high level of canopy tension meaning they deliver a lot of power, allowing you to take a smaller size to cover a larger wind range. The taught anti-slip handles along the central strut make for comfortable hand positioning and intuitive maneuvering. 

Introducing our newest size to the Wing Ride range; 4.5m
 

New size 4.5m
 
Beginners
 
Beginners
As a beginner, you'll most likely want to start with just one wing as you are less likely to venture out in very light or very strong conditions.
 

In general, a good starting wing size is to learn with is a 4m for anyone around the 70kg (155lbs) weight range or a 4.5m wing for anyone over that weight.
 
 

The WR Model III is very easy to learn on, its high stability gives you the confidence needed to make your first hesitant maneuvers. It depowers very effectively, therefore allowing you to quickly regain a comfortable speed.  
 
Intermediate / Advanced
 
Intermediate to advanced
Once you have mastered the effective pump technique, your level of potential frustration reduces dramatically, and you can find yourself being able to cover a much larger wind range with just one or two wing sizes.
 

Based on a proficient 70-80kg rider with substantial experience in all conditions, a 4.5m is usually the ideal size.
 

Having developed the skills required to maintain power in light wind or hold your own in gnarly conditions you’ll be able to prolong your water time. For a full quiver, we recommend a 3m, 4.5m, and for those really light days a 6m.
 
We have created a guide based specifically for our WR model III to help you pick the best-suited sizes:

 


Takuma Kujira 1210

 

I been asked to post my thoughts about the Kujira 1210 once I'd had a chance to use it. Only used it 3 times to date but WOW!!!!!! This is now my favourite foil of this size by a long way!!!! Other foils of comparable size/performance I've used are the Lift HA 170, GoFoil NL160, Axis HPS 980 & BSC 890 - the 1210 is my favourite out of all of them. Why? There's no one foil that is perfect, they all have their pro's and con's, but the 1210 definitely has the edge over the others for me, my riding style, skill level and the conditions I ride in - I'm well aware that others may have different opinions based on their preferences. This is a summary of why I like the 1210 so much: EFFICIENCY - it's lift to glide ratio is amazing!!!!!!! SPEED - although its not the fastest of the foils I've listed above, there wasn't much in it (you definitely can't call it slow by any means), but it's speed seemed to match whatever I was doing at the time so it never felt like it was an issue. PITCH control is awesome, so intuitive, almost like it's on autopilot - I wasn't having to focus on this as much as I have to with the other foils. CARVING this foil is awesome - it makes everything I do feel smooooth!!!!!!!!! Speed of response when changing direction is soooo good, but not overly loose so that it feels squirrely. CONTROL - It almost self-corrects any (small) mistakes you make - I'm sure on other foils I would have wiped out but somehow on the 1210 I would somehow correct and keep going, even mid maneuver. You can push it as much as you want and it still behaves. LIFT - gentle and predictive at takeoff and good for it's size, but where it's lift excels over the other foils is while you are on foil - its lift isn't excessive or overpowering, (ie it doesn't want to cause you to breech) but it allows you to keep flying uninterrupted whereas the other foils would need a few pumps to regain speed and hight on the mast. I'm sure this is also due to its efficiency of glide, but whatever factors are in play the 1210 just seems to keep you up on the sweet spot of the mast for longer than the other foils. PUMPS - LIKE A BEAST!!!!!! Seriously the easiest and most efficient to pump out of all the foils I've listed above. LOW END - best of the bunch! TURBULENCE - The 1210 deals with turbulent water with ease. Yes you feel a bit of turbulence when going through white water or prop wash, but in choppy or disturbed water it literally cuts through it like it was perfect glass. No other foil I've used deals with messy water like the 1210. If you're after the fastest foil of this size the 1210 isn't it. The HPS range from Axis are super fast, and although the NL160 doesn't feel as fast it actually clocked a few of the fastest times on my GPS watch ending up with a similar average as the Axis foils. If you want the loosest foil this isn't it - the Lift HA 170 has the loosest roll of them all, followed by the NL160. If you want the foil with the most efficient glide & lift, pump performance and overall smoothest riding characteristics then the 1210 is IMO the best of the bunch. It never felt like any aspect of its performance was too much or too little, it seems to do everything exceptionally well - there's something very special about this foil.

 

This is the video I took of the really light wind winging session with the Takuma Kujira 1210.
Too small to see what's going on on a phone screen - best watched on a laptop/computer screen.

Its a fluid foil so smooth 

 

 

Words Dom Hoskyns 


KD MAUI Tails

So Ive been using a KD maui tail stab with my Takuma Kujira 1210 now for around 2 months .

specifically the 13.5"

Wow.....what a difference to stability . I liked the 220 Kujira tail, but its roll stability was twitchy , so i had heard good things about the KD tails. Im now getting heaps more glide and pump speed enabling easier 2-4-1 connections .

The KD is much more slippery and gives you much improved speed and projection out of pumps - but, it does have less hold in turns whereas the Kujira tips give grip.

In short if you serious about foiling you have to get one !

Available to order direct from Kane himself on Maui - delivered in a nice little envelope -choose from the bolt hole connections to all the leading brands  !

 


Foil comparison chart

Take a look and compare foil sizes across many brands

click Here FOIL COMPARISON CHART


Axis 1300 & 1150 review

Lots of hype on these two new foils . The 1300 being the newest of the GL series , whereas the 1150 has already made its debut and iss firmly in the hearts of many a wing/ sup and prone foiler !

The 1300 GL is the biggest wing of its kind on the market. There is nothing like it - The absolute Glider. A super light wind version of the 1000 wing.  The axis 1300 makes choppy conditions actually feel smooth . It our opinion best for the foiler who is not particularly active in their pumping nature but enjoys the feeling of foiling , hence riders who are chilled and possibly heavier in the 90kg + weight bracket. It soaks up speed and just gives the smoothest ride .

Dominic is a shop rider of ours based in Oman ...being that its winter in the UK - we thought we'd ship the 1300 out to him to review in the warm waters of the Gulf of Oman .

 

AXIS 1300 COMPLETE Purchasing 

AXIS 1150 COMPLETE Purchasing 

We hope you enjoy !

 

 


TAKUMA KUJIRA

The Kujira Hype

So with many keen worldwide riders managing to get their mitts on a kujira foil before the end of 2020 with outstanding appraise and applaud we thought we would give a frothing overview of the range and why its become the most sought after hydrofoil .period !

The New tubercle foil design is inspired by the humpback whales’ pectoral fins , the new foil also shares Takumas LOL profoil upturned winglets  (albeit smaller) giving much more efficient glide and lift with significantly less drag allowing the rider a more secure balanced feeling while foiling.

 

 

The Kujira foil and what it stands for bases its performance characteristics in the Tubercles on the leading edge of the front foil wing and also the rear. The tubercle effect is a phenomenon where tubercles or 'bumps' on the leading edge of an airfoil can improve its aerodynamics.

These small undulations on the leading edge help direct waterflow and therefore if air is pulled down from the surface - whereas a conventional foil may cavitate and drop, the turbercles channel and can spill air bubbles from holding onto the leading edge causing cavitation, so what is cavitation i hear you say 

Cavitation is a phenomenon in which the reduction of pressure to or below the liquid's vapour pressure leads to the formation of small vapor-filled cavities in the liquid. When subjected to higher pressure, these cavities, called "bubbles" or "voids", collapse and can generate shock waves that may cause the rider to fall . Credit Wikipedia

so quite a lot going on there I hear you say ! Yes definintely ...but worldwide foil riders report ...better high speed control and turning capabilities with incredible rider feedback , by that we mean you don't feel any drag what so ever.

The Kujira foil is offered currently in 4 sizes -750 - 980 -1210 -1440 and with the performance it currently has ...i would imagine any other foils to supercede the Kujira in the future will be bearing the trademark characteristics albeit with advancement in materials 

- Unmatched agility and acceleration while turning and carving in all conditions.

- Effortless low and high speed control.

Have a look at a review of the 980 kujira and first impressions by a shop rider Dominic Hoskyns 

 

Purchasing 

If you feel the Kujira is the hydrofoil for you take a look at options for purchasing  the Takuma Kujira foil here 


Axis 1300

So it's a Monster.

 

Due for release in March Test review - See here https://youtu.be/iVwq9gZFYVg

 

Pre order yours here AXIS 1300 S SERIES 


SUP or Surf foil

So an interesting question came in from a customer and I thought it was worth writing up my response for others to see.

I am considering looking at prone foiling as a new challenge. I haven’t prone surfed since I took up SUP surfing, so probably good beginner for prone surfing, whereas relatively advanced sup surfer. Would you say it is advisable to look at prone rather than SUP foiling? Prone foiling looks like there is such a bigger range of possibilities...

 

I would personally say stick to what you have developed in your water sports game .

For instance ...i used to surf shortboards to a high level (went to north shore twice late 90's to test myself...and managed to return unscathed ....albeit a few boards snapped and "reef inspector" as a new nick name!

Then along came kitesurfing ..which strung me along ...then SUP which i adopted at the start .

I haven't surfed much....since really ....as like you said SUP surfing has its advantages .

Then along comes 'foil surfing' even though there are advantages in prone foiling (smaller kit , lighter etc) it's the hardest to master .. SUP foil the easiest.

 

So I took up the paddle with the foil and i can tell you paddling back out hundreds of metres after a speedy swell ride ..having a paddle in my hands has never been easier.

The SUP foil can also catch waves that don't break whereas the prone foil set up means you turn to alternatives ...such as tow in or the rock hop pump ..Flat water pumping has its own distinct learning curve away from the ocean ...and into the dock , river or lake .

I try and do both ...i want to develop my prone foil game ...but it's time ...which slips by fast ...so I'm a far better SUP surf foiler than prone surf foiler in my opinion.


Foil Downwinding

Which style of foil is best for downwinding?

(Ramblings from a self-confessed foil frother)

 

Downwinding is one of the most exhilarating disciplines within foiling - if you’re already doing it successfully you are undoubtedly nodding your head in agreement, if you are in the process of learning or about to learn, imagine being able to ride the ocean swell like an endless series waves, but I’m sure by now you’ve already watched a number of videos of foilers downwinding and have a good idea of what it’s all about.

Foiling has progressed to the point where downwinding can be done with a wind-wing or without, and when done without you also have the choice of doing it on a prone or a SUP foil board. Whatever your preferred method of downwinding it helps to have the best equipment to use, and the most important part of that equipment is the foil, as that’s the part that has by far the biggest impact on each downwind ride. Ok, the board is essential for getting you up onto the foil, but it’s the foil that you are almost entirely reliant on for the duration you are flying.

Having extensively used pretty much every foil that GoFoil has ever produced (and a few others from various different brands) has given me the opportunity to compare various different foil designs for downwind performance. This has led me to the following conclusion - speed is king!!!!! However that’s going straight to the end of the story, so let's start at the beginning:

Yes, you can downwind with a low aspect foil - I started off my downwinding journey in very light wind conditions with the Maliko 280 (and 200) and a 7m wind wing, and I have to say it was a great platform to learn with - slow and forgiving, super stable, but most important of all it taught me how to read the ocean swell - learning how to stay in the power zone of the swell, knowing which direction to turn in order to keep on the swell, and knowing when to pump the foil to generate speed and when to bring the wind wing back into play. I then progressed to the GL range, using the GL240 in light wind conditions and the GL180 when the wind and swell picked up to a decent level. The GL’s are faster and much more maneuverable than the Maliko’s, and have MUCH better glide - a game changer for downwinding! The GL240 not only allowed me to downwind in conditions as light as the Maliko 280, but it allowed me to have so much more fun - for a big wing the GL240 can be thrown around so much more than the Maliko’s. When conditions were 15 knots and over the GL180 just blew me away. With its extra speed and glide, for the first time I could move forward to the next swell using it’s glide alone, or by pumping the foil while luffing the wing. I could also turn on the swell like surfing a wave, well almost! Then came the NL’s - the 190 is arguably the most versatile, but I went for the 220 and the 160 to extend the range of conditions I could foil in. It’s true that the NL’s have less initial lift than the GL’s, but only slightly, and that’s all part of their riding style - it’s all about speed, and with that speed comes insane levels of glide! When I first started using the NL’s I thought they were harder work than the GL’s. They have a much higher stall speed than the GL’s, and if you don’t keep their speed up they require lots of effort to keep them going, BUT, once you dial into the slightly different technique they need to get the best out of them, you can see why GoFoil chose to call them ‘Next Level’. Focus on keeping their speed going and you’ll unlock their potential - they don’t become effortless, no foil does, but they do allow you to glide faster and for longer than any other foil I’ve ever ridden, and for downwinding this is the key.

Whether I’m downwinding with a wind wing or on a prone board (having been towed up onto the foil behind a boat) the NL’s allow me to move from one bump to the next so much easier than any other foil, as well as allowing me to carve around to link different bumps. In tests I’ve done (all in 12-15 knots) using the GL240, GL180, P180, NL220, the Axis 1150 and the Lift 250, (all foils with great glide), the NL220 was the best by a mile. [When the wind picks up the NL160 is just insane, for the same reasons, but that wasn’t part of this test so no more on that for now.] In my opinion this is because of the superior glide and speed you get from the NL’s. When downwinding it’s so easy to keep their speed up with minimal pumping, it’s like they don’t want to slow down. Despite requiring more effort to pump in other disciplines (flat water pumping, wake foiling transitions, and when pumping to connect multiple waves), I found the NL’s are actually much easier to pump than ALL those other foils when downwinding. The other foils slow down too easily and seem to be affected by the inconsistent nature of the swell forming and reforming, but the NL’s are affected by this much less and as such they keep on gliding. My theory on why the NL’s do this so well is because when downwinding the foil is constantly given lots of little pushes as you connect from swell to swell, thus maintaining the speed that the NL’s need to keep within their optimum range of speed, whereas the other foils require a more consistent power delivery to keep going.

So there you have it, when it comes to downwind performance, speed is king. And glide. Ok, the perfect blend of the two, but you get my point - speed helps to keep you gliding to the next bump...and the next...and the next…

The video clip is me downwinding with the NL220 in 12 knots and very small swell - hopefully it demonstrates what I’ve been trying to explain:


 

I’d like to thank Matt Barker-Smith of ‘Foil Surfing UK’ for his support in sending endless quantities of foil equipment to me to test where I live in Oman - dealing with all the paperwork needed to ship the kit here took the patience of a saint - Thanks Matt. I can strongly recommend anyone checking out his website for a huge amount of foil related information and a big selection of equipment: https://foilsurfing.co.uk/


GoFoil L vs GL vs NL foils

GoFoil L vs GL vs NL foils
 
The easiest way to look at the 3 main foil series from GoFoil are that :
the 'L' series is the beginner range,
the GL's are the intermediate range and the NL's are the expert range, and for the most basic overview that's fine - HOWEVER, the closer you look into them (the more you use them and the better you get), the more you realise that there's a whole lot more to it than that. There's no doubt that the 'L' series will allow you to make the fastest progress through the beginner stages of all foiling disciplines. The low aspect nature of these wings are definitely the best to learn with - I wouldn't advise anyone to start foiling on a high aspect wing, unless maybe they have LOTS of experience with kite foiling or windfoiling. How long you need to stick with the 'L' foils is down to the individual and the amount of time they have on the water, but for most people, as soon as they are ready to progress onto the high aspect foils they will make the transition very quickly and easily, and once dialled in would never dream of going back to a low aspect foil. Beyond the 'L' series it gets a bit more complicated. In theory the natural progression would be to go to the GL series.
They are faster, have awesome glide and are more responsive in turns. In all respects they are up a level in performance from the 'L' series, but they are still very user friendly - mostly because their lift is so easy to control. Again, in terms of progression, the NL's are faster, have more glide and turn tighter than the GL's. They are very well named as 'Next Level'. Sounds easy - happy days! However, the NL's are so user friendly that you don't have to be an expert to use them, and the GL's won't hold you back as you progress. They both have very specific characteristics that means you might prefer one over the other, or one range might be better for the conditions you are riding in. The NL's are all about speed - from this point of view, the 'L' series are the slowest, the GL's are medium speed, and the NL's are the fastest - super fast, but with this speed comes a price - because they have a relatively high stall speed compared to the other wings they have to be kept flying fast or they will stall. They also need more speed to get them up on foil as they have slightly less initial lift. These are the main reasons why they are considered the 'expert' range, not because they are difficult to handle when they are flying, oh no... when they are flying they are phenomenal - speed, glide, super responsive, yet very easy to control. The reality is that you don't have to be an 'expert' to get them up on foil or to prevent them from stalling, this isn't the issue, it's just a matter of preference - does this higher-octane style of foiling suit you? Pumping the NL's is also a very different experience to pumping the GL's. You absolutely must keep high on the mast and keep their speed up or they will quickly stall, and it takes more effort to pump them compared to the GL's, but because you are travelling faster you can cover the same distance or more in the same time - as long as you have the leg power. And let's not forget those wingtips - they are sharp! I've cut myself more on the NL wingtips than all other parts of foil equipment combined. 
 
The GL's shouldn't be dismissed just because the NL's have arrived. These are the true all rounders. They can be ridden hard or chilled, they are super smooth, user friendly, and looking at the entire range they have so much to give. The GL240 has awesome lift at slow speed and is one of the easiest foils to pump. It will fly on the smallest waves with ease, and when paired with a smaller tail can be very playful for a big wing. It may be slow but that's the point - in being slow it can deal with the conditions that other foils can't, and it deals with them extremely well. The GL210 is also awesome to pump and is considerably faster and more responsive than the 240. The GL180 is, in my opinion, the best all-round performing foil on the market. It does everything really well and can be used in the biggest range of conditions and in all foiling disciplines. There's a reason why it's GoFoil's best-selling foil. The GL140 is reputed to be one of the best surf-orientated foils out there, and pumps well for its size. The smaller GL's are used in ever increasingly extreme conditions that I've not experienced but from what I've seen they seem to perform very well!
So if you're thinking about GL vs NL, try to decide if you want that extra performance edge or whether you want an all-round performer - they both rock, just in different ways. I'm really pleased that Matt asked me to write a comparison of the GoFoil wings as it made me re-evaluate my opinions of them all. Having recently been storming on the NL220 & 160 I realised that, as much as I love them, the GL's are just as awesome in their own right. I still use the GL240 for flat water pumping and super light wind winging, and if I could only have one wing it would be the GL180 for sure. Yes I would miss the NL's, but if I ever feel the need to have a chilled session it's nice to know they are there. After all, if every session is extreme, none of them are!
 
Words by Dominic Hoskyns